The Messianic Jewish Rabbinical Council (MJRC) was formally established in May 2006. It consists of a group of ordained Messianic Jewish Rabbis and associated leaders who share a common vision for Messianic Jewish practice rooted in Torah, instructed by Tradition, and faithful to Messiah Yeshua in the twenty-first century.

The MJRC had its beginnings five years earlier. At that time a set of Messianic Jewish leaders from New England invited some of their colleagues from outside the region to join them in working on a common set of halakhic standards for themselves and their congregations. While other areas of Messianic Jewish life are of profound importance, such as worship, ethics, education, and social concern, we believed that halakhic standards had received far less attention than their place in Messianic Jewish life warranted.

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by Rabbi Jason Forbes

We never could have foreseen the impact a single local synagogue program could have on so many communities…

In 2010 our community developed the Riverton Mussar program.  The concept was formed out of years of questioning how better to be a light of Mashiach Yeshua in a very practical and everyday manner.  Over the course of reading and studying, we discovered the concept of Mussar, a personal discipline meant to build good character.  We saw the amazing practicality and profound spiritual depth it provided through honing character traits.

We were most inspired by two books by Alan Morinis (head of the Mussar Institute), Climbing Jacob’s Ladder and Everyday Holiness.  Like Morinis, we sought a path of personal self-improvement for the sake of clarity and a better life.  We also wanted to share the power of this transformative practice with our local community. For years, we had seen too many people nearly hit rock bottom or lack consistency in their lives.  We saw Mussar as an integral tool for a more meaningful life.

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Remembering Yeshua Together

by Rabbi Mark Kinzer

On the night before his arrest and martyrdom, in the context of a Passover (or Passover-like) meal, Yeshua commanded his disciples to remember his atoning sacrifice through a ritual act. The early followers of Yeshua obeyed this commandment of their Master, and celebrated regularly a ritual meal in which bread and wine represented Yeshua’s gift of his own life (1 Corinthians 11:17-34). This rite soon became the central act of worship for the ekklesia of the nations. It remains central for many of the followers of Yeshua throughout the world.

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"The MJRC consists of ordained Rabbis and associates who promote a life of faithfulness to God's covenant among Jewish followers of Messiah Yeshua by providing realistic and practical guidelines for Messianic Jewish observance."

Our Mission Statement

Rooted in Torah, instructed by Tradition, faithful to Messiah Yeshua

MJRC

The Messianic Jewish Rabbinical Council (MJRC) consists of ordained Rabbis and associates who promote a life of faithfulness to God's covenant among Jewish followers of Messiah Yeshua by providing realistic and practical guidelines for Messianic Jewish observance.

Our core mission is to define, clarify, and foster standards of observance for council members and for those in the Messianic Jewish community who look to us for leadership.

We also exist to serve the professional and personal needs of our members by fostering high standards of professional competence, ethical behavior, and halakhic conduct.

The Messianic Jewish Rabbinical Council (MJRC) was formally established in May 2006. It consists of a group of ordained Messianic Jewish Rabbis and associated leaders who share a common vision for Messianic Jewish practice rooted in Torah, instructed by Tradition, and faithful to Messiah Yeshua in the twenty-first century.

The MJRC had its beginnings five years earlier. At that time a set of Messianic Jewish leaders from New England invited some of their colleagues from outside the region to join them in working on a common set of halakhic standards for themselves and their congregations. While other areas of Messianic Jewish life are of profound importance, such as worship, ethics, education, and social concern, we believed that halakhic standards had received far less attention than their place in Messianic Jewish life warranted.